Tuesday, 18 March 2008

Soupy heart

Since they were tiny, both of our children have delighted us by looking for shapes in their food...look it's a bridge, a nose, a dog they would say. As adults, Ian and I look at these things that they show us and are just about able to make out which part they may have construed to be something other than a slice of bread edged with bite marks. We have old books full of optical illusions, the type where there first looks to be a man's face...but if you study it for half an hour longer the realisation suddenly jumps out from the page that from another angle, when you allow your vision to be drawn further into the page, it is also a vase. How perfectly lovely that children spend so much of their time not limiting themselves to looking at things simply for what they are, but are constantly seeking out an otherness to their surroundings, finding a place for an alternative interpretation.

One day last week Dinosaur-boy and I sat together eating soup and ciabatta for our lunch. 'Look, Mummy, it's a heart!' he had said giggling. I had looked up expecting to see an unrecognisable splot of soup on the breakfast bar...but was amazed to see that the soup from his spoon really had been spilt into the most perfectly-formed heart.

I shall miss sharing lunch with him in September...I wonder if I shall start looking for shapes in my solitary lunches and taking pictures of my finds to show when they come home...or if I will lose the will to bother making lunch at all once I'm home alone. Probably the latter, children are so good for giving adults a structure to their days.

16 comments:

  1. What a sweet story and that bit of soup is indeed a perfect heart shape.

    It's bittersweet to see our children grow. We're delighted on one hand and sad about the passing of time that changes everything--all at once.

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  2. And it goes so very quickly too. Lovely little tale Florence xx

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  3. That is so neat.
    I had a heart in a pancake once...I think it's on my flickr page somewhere.
    I love that your kids do this. What a great way to look at the world.

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  4. There's a little a bit of love in everything is what my Granny always says, and it is so true!

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  6. Sorry I will try again.
    I am not looking forward to lunch in september either as I will loose one to school aswell. I love this age when children can see so much in life and want to share it with you.

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  7. I feel exactly the same way about child free lunches. Luckily, Johnny will still be coming home until after Christmas, but after that I face the prospect of many a lonely lunch-hour grazing forlornly at the fridge door.

    Lunchtime chatter is precious.

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  8. What a sweet, sweet story....I heart that! You hit the nail on the head, Florence....kids do give us adults structure to our day.....and they open our eyes to things we would otherwise never see. We must enjoy their each and every lesson!

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  9. There is so much I love about this post. My kids do this too, and yes, I love it. I have taught my son to do it with clouds too, so now he is always pointing out shapes in the sky. It really makes my heart sing. Thanks again for such a beautiful post. A lovely reminded to enjoy these little moments :)

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  10. Oh, losing a child to school is so bittersweet...I still have a couple of years with my little one (the gingermonkey - that's where the name comes from, by the way!) but I sobbed and sobbed every day when the big one went to school. Now though, I love it - she's full of tales of grown up things (well, 8yr old grown up things) and I look at her and think 'didn't we do well - especially when we have parents' evening and the teachers sing her praises and I can only just about get out of the door with my newly swollen head!

    Thank you for the Erin O Conner comment - my head has swollen quite a bit right now too!!! (blush)

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  11. You will be so busy lunching with friends, crafting and writing lovely comments on everybodys blogs that you won't mind a bit. And then it will be half term and you can indulge your passion for spilt soup and chatter! It will be the best of both worlds.

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  12. My Greek mother in law always reads tea leaves which my children love. I know what you mean about the quiet lunch times, although we're not quite there yet. I wish I could say I'd relish it but I think I'll miss them dreadfully! Just think of the extra crafting time!

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  13. I love the little soupy heart! Since my youngest started school this past September, I miss her most at lunchtime. She was ready to go and loves it, and I have fun on my days off, but it's the lunchtimes that still feel a little lonesome!

    Thanks for your comments on my commute. I've added you to my links - I hope this is okay.

    x

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  14. awh! I work outside the home (as they say) so only get those moments at weekends, and then they are normally too hectic and full of mayhem to allow any such reflectiveness, but I feel your pain...I managed ok when the first one went to school but am already dreading the second heading off
    speaking of hearts...I have one up for grabs at the moment...pop over

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  15. what a lovely story, I know what you mean about lunch on your own, often I don't bother to have a proper lunch, then by 3 oclock I'm starving.......

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  16. That heart is amazing and it is so sweet that your children go shape hunting!

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I now tend to reply within the comments section, so please do check back if you've asked a question or wish to chat.

Florence x