Monday, 26 November 2012

Finished



So finally, the piecing is over. Just a simple 1" straight border of dark red is to be added to each side and then it will be ready for its frame. I scoured my favourite junk shops with my husband after breakfast on Friday morning and drew a blank, so I'm having a square frame made up in walnut wood, with a creamy white mount inside. It all seemed surprisingly affordable until the shop rang this morning to let me know that the boy I'd dealt with had neglected to write down whether the frame was to be 36" or 36cm when I was in the shop. When I told them it was actually inches we realised he may have misquoted me substantially. However, the shop were happy to honour their original price and I've offered to meet them halfway on the extra as I don't want to constantly look at the frame and feel awful that the shop lost money on making it. 


To give you sense of scale (so far demonstrated against cats, mannequins and now, me) this is the size of it. I'm so looking forward to finally having it framed. Nina asked why have it behind glass and not just have it as a wall hanging, but while I'm fairly relaxed about seeing my quilts dragged around the house and repurposed for camp-making material, I feel much more stressy about something on the wall being handled and then hanging rumpled. It's the kind of thing where I'd be sitting chatting to people over dinner, desperately wanting only to straighten it on the wall behind them. It's just better for all of us if it's behind glass and stays where it's meant to!


I decided to commission the frame being made and then to set it in myself as I'm worrying over whether it will lie perfectly flat and taut. In some places there are 12 intersecting seams, so there's quite a bit of bulk behind the scenes and I'm currently trying to think through what will be the best way to secure it to the frame base so that it stays flat. I've considered de-bulking some areas, but worry over the fraying fibres of the Oakshott unravelling faster than I can seal them in place with clear nail varnish!


This week though, I will enjoy having it sit in the corner of our bedroom. No, we still haven't sanded, filled in or oiled the floorboards. I've temporarily wedged balls of foil down the largest holes to avoid potentially losing expensive things, such as machine feet or wedding rings down them. This seemed like a cunning plan until I realised that the vacuum cleaner sucks them straight out the moment it runs over them, so vacuuming is now a tentative business. It's amazing how quickly these things can become familiar when you live with them though - a mixture of wood and foil as flooring now looks perfectly normal! But I'm looking forward to a time when this isn't so.

Florence x

26 comments:

  1. Florence, that is stunning. I'm very much hoping one of your next projects might be a minature for FoQ2013. Can't wait to see it framed.

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  2. That is beautiful. Just stunning.

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  3. What a thing of joy! It really shows the visual effects you can achieve with plainer fabrics. I'm with you on the framing behind glass idea. Can't advise on getting the flatness right as I haven't done this before, good luck though!

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  4. Good gracious, Florence, I am nearly speechless. That is one of the loveliest things I have ever, ever seen. You are truly an artist!

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  5. Just beautiful!

    When it comes to mounting I'd place it over a layer of poly wadding, you can pick out little lumps behind the bulkiest seam junctions to allow the whole thing to lay flat. I'd lace the patchwork over a board to keep it prefectly flat, in the same way as cross stitch pices are mounted. Hope this helps.

    Ruth xx

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  6. Stunningly beautiful,it will look amazing encased in glass with a glossy walnut frame. The colours are so rich and vibrant and remind me of our travels in India many years ago.

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  7. It's gorgeous Florence! Could you use fusible fleece on the back? I like to do that with paper pieced projects where I have lots of seams because it keeps them all right where I put them. Just a thought. It will be stunning on your wall.

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  8. It's more than gorgeous. You are so very clever, the colours are a dream. Hope you enjoyed making it. So what's next x

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  9. Stunning, Florence. Just beautiful.

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  10. Oh Florence - it's beautiful - a true masterpiece! It's something I can imagine seeing in a historical house, if that makes any sense?! No idea on the framing of it, but my initial thought was to stretch it over a very thin frame and staple it so as to keep it taught and elevate it ever so slightly from the base? Can't wait to see it all finished - clever you! x

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  11. I didn't realise how big it was until I saw you posing with it Florence. It's absolutely stunning and I look forward to seeing it framed.

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  12. In response to previous comments, what the framers ought to do is stretch it around some foam core board, using pins to keep it perfectly stretched. If there is some spacing between the glass and the front of the fabric, then this will solve the problem of the many-seams-meeting problem. I used to work as a professional framer years ago and this is what we used to do with tapestries/embroideries/other precious and intricate fabric pieces. As a precaution, I'd probably be tempted to use UV coated glass too, to make sure the sun doesn't fade any of those gorgeous colours!

    It truly is a stunning creation, Florence!

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  13. WOW! Another danger of my frame-free idea is dust, of course, which might have caused the hanging to need washing and then you'd have had to straighten out your joins all over again. The frame sounds lovely, and I'm thrilled to hear of you benefiting from our ridiculous state of semi-metrication which usually serves only to baffle and infuriate me! It's a really beautiful thing you've made. x

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  14. Gosh, this is absolutely gorgeous! Great job, you!

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  15. Just gorgeous! And I cannot believe you finished it so fast!

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  16. Ooooh, yummy! Very inspiring...but I think my fingers are quite as nimble as yours!

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  17. Lovely piece of art. I have used adhesive mounting board to hang textiles in frames before. The pieces have been smaller than this but the fabric sticks well.
    Lavinia

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Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a message - it's always really lovely to hear from people.

I now tend to reply within the comments section, so please do check back if you've asked a question or wish to chat.

Florence x