Thursday, 4 December 2014

Brambleberry Ridge Giveaway!


I rarely run giveaways on my blog, but with one in October and one in December, it may seem as though all the buses have arrived here at once. I know you probably would have actually withered away to a sad little heap if you were actually stood waiting at a bus stop for two months…but it's relative. Anyway, the Number 8 bus has arrived. (Say what?! There's 8 fat quarters in the stack I'm about to give away and it's quite a nice bulbous-looking number, so if a bus has to stop at my blog, then I'd have a preference for it being the Number 8).


This is a glorious little stack of Violet Craft's Brambleberry Ridge, that Elephant in my Handbag, one of my blog sponsors, are offering up to you. Stephanie and Jo were kind enough to let me take my pick of what I wanted to share with you and I was really keen to see this fabric collection in strokeable proximity (but don't let that put you off!) and thought you might love it too.


Brambleberry Ridge is actually several hundred times nicer than I even imagined it to be and I'm feeling slightly pained by having to give it away. It's partly a tactile thing. I'd anticipated a fabric with so much gold printing to feel a little crispier than regular quilting cotton (the golds I've come into contact with in the past often have), but it's actually entirely the opposite. To me, this cotton feels slightly more silky and fine than standard quilting cotton (I can't determine whether it is actually a different base cloth or not and I'm not familiar enough with Micheal Miller fabrics generally to be able to compare it against their other lines - this may just be how their fabrics feel, or it could be the effect of the gold - either way, it's lovely and my husband agrees that I'm not imagining it and that it's curiously softer than my other quilting cottons in his period of brief enforced fabric stroking). It's just really quite divine.


And then there's the colours…these two above are my favourite. I just think they're perfection. They remind me of peppermint creams (which are also perfection).


I remember my mother giving me my first peppermint cream when I was about four years old on the long journey north to see relatives. She passed it through the gap in the front seats to where I was sitting in the dark with my sister in the back of our little Alfa Sud and when I put it in my mouth and it melted on my tongue, my little four-year-old tastebuds and mind may have actually imploded. Even now, handmade peppermint creams are one of my favourite foods on earth, although I don't think I've ever tasted any as good as the ones that I ate on that late night journey. My mother had bought them at a school fate or cake sale earlier that day and I've never been able to recreate a peppermint cream that tastes quite as perfect, but if you'd like my almost perfect recipe for the ones above, you can find it in my archives here. They are delicious (she said, immodestly).


Anyway, these gorgeous fabrics are currently sitting on the back of my chair (in a non-leant-upon way - I'm slightly clueless as to why I chose a chair with a back, as I never actually sit back when I'm typing or sewing, but I really adore this chair, so it possibly earned its place for aesthetic reasons) until I post them off to one of you.


Here's what you have to do to enter: just tell me one of your own memories - adult or childhood - of an amazing meal or food that you still long to recreate exactly or can still almost taste when you think of it. Or indeed, if there's a certain fabric collection that reminds you of a certain food I'd love to hear about that too.

Florence x

Ps. The latter suggestion makes me think that's some odd variation of colour synesthesia (where names and words are linked in the person's mind by colour - I have this and I'm guessing a lot of visual thinkers do too). Fabric Eatesthesia?

Pps. You can currently get 10% off at Elephant in my Handbag using the code 'FLOSSIE'.

119 comments:

  1. My grandma is from Hungary and always made me Hungarian food. My favourite was gomboc. A potato dough dumpling full of plums. She still makes me them for my birthday every year with a side of strawberry blintzes.

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  2. The food memory my mother will never let me forget is my grandmother's shepherd's pie. I loved it and always complained that my mother's didn't taste as good. So one day, Nannie made one for Mum to bring home and give me without letting who'd made it.

    And yes, you've guessed it, seven-year-old me finished it and declared it 'good, but not as good as Nannie's'. Of course!

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  3. The Christmas morning coffee cake my mom made every year! P.S. That fabric is divine!!!

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  4. Ah, the wonder of Marmite Whirlies! My mum used to make these for every birthday tea party and I have never eaten them anywhere else....oooh, and egg and cress sandwiches and jelly and blamange, which I still make for special teas.

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  5. School dinners were good when I was a child. My favourite meal was cheese and onion potatoes followed by butterscotch tart. I also liked fly cemetery (currant slices) and thick custard, but hated tapioca pudding. We had to eat all our dinners so, as you can imagine I have never eaten tapioca ever again. Haute cuisine it was not but I loved those school dinners.

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  6. My dad always make delicious fudge during the holiday season, and it doesn't seem like Christmas until I've had some. I have the recipe, and try to make it, but it's never quite exactly the same as his. So yummy.

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  7. Oh my goodness, this fabric is heavenly! So many beautiful possibilities.
    As for a favourite food memory - I think my granny's vegetable soup, that she always served in bowl/mug hybrids (that I have never seen since). Such a delicious broth, which must be consumed alongside large chunks of 'hard head' loaf (old fashioned white bread) and lashings of butter. Mmmmmmmmm

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  8. This time of year I often think about walking along Oxford Street as a child, getting excited as I smelt roasted chestnuts being cooked along the roadside. My mum always used to buy me a bag and my hands would be black by the time I'd finished! Not as many sellers like that these days & I avoid Oxford Street at this time of year...when did I become such a Scrooge!

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  9. Oh my goodness, this fabric collection I love! I can almost feel it in my hands. My best food memory is from a little restaurant called The Shaved Duck in St. Louis. Wes Johnson, the chef at the time, made a dish with trout on a bed of blackeyed peas and fried green tomatoes. I never liked fish or fried green tomatoes. I cleaned my plate so fast that my husband was flabbergasted. We lived across the street from that place, and I will NEVER forget that meal that changed my tastebuds forever. Thank you, Wes Johnson & The Shaved Duck!!

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  10. Oh that fabric, it's beautiful, I'm not sure I wouldn't just sit and look at it.
    My Mum used to make us sweetcorn fritters, usually when Dad was on shift (he was a fireman so did shifts that covered tea times). They were delicious, so maybe it's the memory of those quiet cosy evenings that make those fritters seem so yummy. I've tried to recreate them but they don't taste the same. Maybe thats because I'm not 8 any more :-) xxx

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  11. My mum's bread pudding (quite different to bread and butter pudding!!!). Warm and stodgy, it was standard for Sunday tea time, and sends me straight back to having my long hair brushed out after a bath in front of the fire. I make it for my kids now.

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  12. The most vivid food memory I have is of my Dad always cooking a a Chinese meal for us from scratch on a Saturday night.
    My Dad is not an emotional man, he has never told me he loves me, although I know he does-expressing emotions was just not the done thing in his Lancashire born and bred family.
    However, the time he took to make every dish perfect, to serve it up in beautiful dishes and bowls, to make sure we all sat around our dining table with no distractions, is a memory which will stay with me always.
    He may not vocalise his love for his family, but those precious unhurried Saturday meals said everything.

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  13. Mine's a bit of a weird one, it's the faintest of faint memories. For me, southern fried spiced chicken drumsticks are forever connected to the flying monkeys in Wizard of Oz. I must have been about 4 as we were still living in Kent at the time and still now, every time I see the film I am also seeing and smelling those drumsticks. Why it has stayed with me probably has more to do with the film than the food as I'm not even a fan of the drumsticks and don't remember us having them at any other time!

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  14. What a lovely giveaway! The food I strive most to create is something I myself once made. I had a class project in French class when I was 14. We were having a French party and my job was to make the chocolate mousse. My teacher gave me the recipe and it was the most perfect, light but dense chocolate mousse that ever was. The recipe had both whipped egg whites and cream, as well as coffee for some bitterness. At some point, the original recipe was lost and every other attempt I've made has not lived up to the Mousse of My Memories....sigh....not for lack of trying....

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  15. ooh it's gorgeous! my favourite thing from childhood is my gran's scotch trifle. it's got no jelly and has amaretti biscuits in it.i always loved trifle and was always disappointed when it wasn't like this one. she died after a period of dementia last year and so i have taken over with recipe in hand as family trifle maker. we always have it at big family occasions like xmas and it's just perfect. when my gran died i was given the crystal bowl she always made it in too, so it is doubly perfect!

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  16. Wow, that fabric is amazing, love the gold! I wish I could recreate my Mum's lamb stew with veg grown in the garden. She has sadly gone now and nothing has ever tasted as good but it is a fond memory of my childhood.

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  17. My grandma always made the most delicate challah bread... Even though I have her recipe, it's just never the same.... The fabric is just too cute! Thank you so much for the chance to win :)

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  18. On Wednesdays at school, we always had Mexican food. It was divine in my young mind. I'd love to go back and eat another school meal (how weird is that??) with cranberry bars and beet cake. I'd also like to have that luscious fabric! Thank you for asking this question. It made me look in the attic of my mind, behind some old crates and a trunk, hidden far back!

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  19. My food memory would have to be any one of my lovely Mum's lovely sponge puds, jam, treacle, fruit, chocolate covered in thick creamy custard. Our family always sat down to a gorgeous home cooked dinner every evening and had a good catch up. Happy memories. PS My Mum still makes lovely sponge puds when we visit, takes me right back to the 70s.

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  20. When I was about 10 I used to go round to a neighbours house for tea once week without my sisters. She was like a third grandmother and we'd always have a gorgeous Potok chop dish with caramelised onions and apples with proper gravy made with gravy browning not instant granules which I'd stand and stir whilst it thickened so it didn't end up lumpy then we'd watch The Bill or A Question of Sport. I've never found anything to match the deliciousness of those pork chops.....and now I'm very hungry! X

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  21. I'd love to recreate my Granny's apple pie. She was not a good baker, because she would always leave out essential ingredients which she considered extravagant. Like the second egg. But her apple pie was beautiful, sprinkled with sugar.

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  22. My grandmother always made this creamy chicken casserole--some lovely butter + cream + chicken + butter dish--when I was little. It tasted exactly like comfort and happiness and being loved. I have all of her recipes now, in three large boxes in the basement, and for the life of me I can't find it. That woman never met a recipe she wasn't interested in cutting out and saving for later. I have two dozen recipes for various alcoholic punches (she didn't drink, and she didn't condone others drinking; I am at a loss), but no casserole.

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  23. My Nana's cinnamon buns - I would fly across the country to have those! She made them for us as kids and when I went to university. We wrapped them in pairs so I could freeze them and thaw two to eat whenever I wanted. SUCH a treat. I still can't make them like she can though she is 94 now so doesn't make them anymore.

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  24. I love the bird fabric!!

    In Pittsburgh on the Strip I once bought an apple pastry with warm custard sauce that was awesome! It was sold by an Ancient Greek woman outside her church so I think it was a fundraiser.

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  25. When I was about nine my mam was having a sort out of her baking cupboard and so decided to make a cake from all the ingredients she needed to use up. It was delicious (from memory it was a fruity spongy tea loaf type affair) but, as its name suggests (Never To Be Made Again Cake) we will never be able to recreate it as we have no idea what went in it!

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  26. My grandmother makes a wild sea duck stew that is just amazing. It's been a long time since she's cooked a sea duck because they're hard to come by, but I followed her around the kitchen when I was a teenager, taking notes as she prepared duck stew. I still haven't recreated it, but I hope to someday try.

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  27. Oh it has to be fish and chips when walking along Blackpool promenade - for years our family holidays where to the seaside resort. Loved it but hated the sailing across as we came over from the wilds of Northern Ireland!

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  28. My Grandma used to be our school dinner lady and on the days when we stayed at Grandma's whilst Mum was at work late, we'd wait for her after school in the kitchen. She'd always bring us a leftover Smartie cookie to save for when we got back to hers. Mmmmm, Smartie cookies dipped in hot Ribena at Grandma's house. Odd combination but so good after walking home from school in the winter. I've tried to recreate the cookies but no recipe comes close to those squishy, spotty delights!

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  29. My mom makes a dish we call "city chicken" it's actually pork and veal skewers, but they are amazing tasting. Like I can taste it now!!

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  30. When I lived in Alabama there was a German restaurant that had this chicken/honey/pecan/apple thing. I've been trying unsuccessfully to recreate that for years!

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  31. Hi thanks for the chance for this lovely fabric. One of my favourite memories I can't repeat. Cockles walking on the front at Blackpool looking at the lights. But then a migraine on the way home. Proved since it was the cockles. What a shame K xXx

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  32. It's GOT to be peanut butter! Whenever I taste it I'm transported back to a 1960s formica filled kitchen with a blue and white check floor, thinking it was the most extraordinary thing I'd ever had in my mouth. Have just heard I'm going to be a grand parent for the first time next June! so the fabric would make a wonderful baby quilt. Here' hoping!

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  33. My mom's fudge. Totally different than any other fudge I've ever tried - it's grainy and dissolves in your mouth. It's from the old Settlement Cookbook and I can almost smell it cooking. May just have to make some soon... Thanks for the chance to win such beautiful fabric!

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  34. My Mum often made handmade 'Turkish Delight' for Christmas. Unfortunately as I've been vegetarian for many years it's been a long while since I've been able to have any due to the gelatine. Thinking about persuading her to make some up with an equivalent though apparently it doesn't really produce the same results.

    Fabric wise I've come across a few Miller collections which have really surprised me and I'm quite convinced that the base fabric has changed. The 'Rustique' collection has a feel just like you described, it's beautiful!

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  35. My grandma's caramel popcorn. She died before i was born, but i know her through stories and her recipes. That popcorn was at every family event growing up. I make it now and my kids love it and learn a little family history from all the stories and memories associated with it.
    and i actually have my own synesthesia, i smell in colors. I didnt know it was weird until i told my husband something smelled purple. It came in handy when i was learning to cook, if the colors play nicely so do the flavors.

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  36. My mum's pavlova. She always made the most incredible pavlova. Crunchy and sugary outside, light as air inside, topped with whipped cream and fresh passion fruit from the vine that grew in our driveway. I can still remember being mesmerised, watching her make huge peaks for the meringue before she put it in the oven. It was truly a work of art.

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  37. Such pretty fabrics! The first thing that comes to mind is my dad's Apple crumble. He used to make it in winter on a Saturday night and I don't know what he did but it's the best I've ever had!

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  38. I always used to request a chicken casserole as my birthday dinner. It was roasted chicken served in a mushroom sauce (Maggi soup mix) with spaghetti noodles (dried pasta) in there too. I never make it because the rest of my family don't like mushrooms, but I would like to try it again one day.

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  39. My grannie's 'chocolate stuff', known throughout our family, cousins too, as such. She never visited without bringing a vintage tartan tin full of her 'stuff'. We all loved it. In theory she passed her recipe to my mum but we're pretty sure she missed something out as it is never quite the same (but no one knows whether the omission was accidental or deliberate). I would so love to have one last piece of grannie's 'chocolate stuff'.

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  40. my mother made potato candy long ago, mom is gone now so i don't know how she made it

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  41. Apple pie and apple bread from my husband's grandmother--she pass this spring and I haven't tracked down the recipes yet.

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  42. I remember tasting my grandmas sponge cake, I never knew sponge could be that light! It was like it was made by angels! And it was sandwiched with whipped cream and fresh strawberries (grown by my grandfather) and homemade strawberry. Genuinely the best cake I have ever had, and will ever have in my life!
    Beautiful fabric
    Knitwitsowls@gmail.com

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  43. I not sure what's nicer- this beautiful fabric or your memories of your first peppermint cream. Back in 2011 my son was working at La Petit Maison in London. We came to visit him and were treated to THE most amazing meal, with accompanying wines, I have ever eaten! It is a very special memory for me and my husband!

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  44. I think that there is some magic in childhood that makes everything more wonderful so when you have the same experience as an adult it isn't quite the same. There are the books that changed your life, shows you loved (I am thinking original 21 Jump St here). Anyway, foodwise, I miss my grandma's Polish cooking. She was amazing and cooked everything without recipes. She taught us but of course we were never as good and now that she is gone I miss her and her cooking especially around this time of year

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  45. There are two things I never got to taste exactly like that again: one, some cookies my maternal grandmother made every week; the other, the very weak coffee my paternal grandmother served me with bits of bread aligned like soldiers that I soaked in the coffee before eating. Oh, that bread and coffee!

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  46. My mother's cream puffs, filled with whipped cream. I was sometimes allowed to whip the cream (using an crank-type eggbeater) but the actual pastry shells were like some sort of miracle every time. And even though I have not tasted one of those cream puffs in many, many years, I can almost taste one now!

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  47. I live the other side of the world from my family now, and often miss homemade tuna casserole. My sisters Elisabeth and Sarah each made it well, but when they cooked it together it was just amazing - cheesy and creamy and full of deliciousness. I've never been able to recreate it - I'm not sure you can even get the same ingredients here in England. It is proper comfort food.

    I liked your reference to the number 8 bus, also! I get the number 8 in London, and it's a brilliant bus. They've put the new Routemasters on, and it's always fun to get the top front seat and watch the Christmas lights along the way.

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  48. Oh that's so pretty! My food memory would be my Grannie's lemon sponge cake - she hated cooking and it was pretty much the only thing she made but it was delicious, with thick white icing with chunks of lemon peel in it. Just thinking about it takes me back to her red yellow and turquoise kitchen with the 'swimming pool' lino watching the cake being wheeled out on her shiny gold hostess trolley!

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  49. Well, as it's nearing Christmas I can't help thinking about the Christmas dinners we used to have, roast potatoes and parsnips with roast lamb and mint sauce, heavenly...then I turned vegan...I can still have the roast potatoes an parsnips, haven't found an alternative for the roast lamb though yet
    I don't really like gold really, but I have to say, the fabric is lovely, the colours go well with the gold print and the bird fabric is gorgeous

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  50. Years ago, I was housesitting over the holidays, and the family had these amazing frosted sugar cookies in their freezer. I almost ate them all (blush!). I've tried to recreate them ever since, but never quite get that cookie perfection.

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  51. After over twenty years some of my friends still rave about my Mum's pizza - a thick doughy base with a tomato, onion, mushroom and bacon sauce and mountains of cheddar cheese on top, but my favourite of hers has to homemade scotch eggs. I'm looking forward to them when I visit at Christmas! Such lovely fabrics!

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  52. My 'wish I could make' was one of my own. I once made a chocolate mousse from scratch for a dinner party and I messed up the recipe somehow - instead of the light, fluffy mousse it was supposed to be, it was much denser and richer and frankly amazing. Everyone loved it. But did I know what I'd done wrong? No. Couldn't recreate it again and it was so frustrating! I must have doubled something or halved something or left something out... I never discovered it and had to run for miles to burn off all the test subjects.

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  53. Oh this is such beautiful fabric and a wonderful giveaway. So many wonderful food memories from when I was little. I was a real fussy eater so you'd think I'd have horrible memories but no! I long to eat my nan's Sunday roast; she made wonderful mash potatoes, sadly she's not here anymore. And my mom makes this wonderful hearty soup she always called 'macaroni' but was essentially a pimped minestrone, using farfalle pasta no less. What little girl doesn't like bows in here meal?! Mmm. My tummy is rumbling now!

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  54. Beautiful fabric. So many foods that remind me years gone by, both by Mum and Gran were fab cooks. Rice pudding, current buns and Eccles cakes...mmm

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  55. Wow, this fabric is amazing! I love my mom's enchiladas and no matter how hard I try, mine never taste quite as good!

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  56. My grandmother's perogies. By the time I was old enough to want to learn to make them, she was too old and had stopped making them. They are a chore to make but well worth it. I can make them but not like her. I always get sad when I think about her. I miss her dearly. Thanks for the great giveaway. The fabric is stunning. I've also shared your giveaway on my Giveaway List for sewers & quilters at wowilikethat.com. Thanks again. (debbie@wowilikethat.com)

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  57. I saw some fabric with deers on it and material with fish

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  58. Oh, that pink and blue and gold! I love it. Anyway, when I was very young, my mom-mom and pop-pop always babysat me. Every week, the Charles Chip truck would drive up to their house and we'd buy one tin of sand tart cookies. They were super thin, crispy, but cinnamon-y and sugary. I'd go nuts and have about five a day with my daily hot tea with them. When they died and Charles Chip stopped coming around, I cried. Then, when I grew up, I was never able to find a recipe that came out like them. I found a new one this year I'm going to try. Wish me luck. I miss those cookies!

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  59. My Mom's raspberry thumbprint cookies! They are a wonderful buttery cookie that just melts in your mouth. She gave me the recipe so I could make them but forgot to tell me to chill the dough-so mine spread out all over the cookie sheet and burned! Too funny when I think about it now!

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  60. I have to second Shy's comment about the Hungarian food. My grandparents are also Hungarian and I love my grandmother's plum dumplings. When we were sick she would make us Hungarian turkey soup with light fluffy (non-plum) dumplings inside that were also delicious and I have no idea how to make them!

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  61. Oh my gosh I absolutely love this bundle!!!!!!!!! I am a cooker not baker but I sure miss my grandmothers homemade cookies of all kinds!!!!!!! sonjasmith76@yahoo.com

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  62. My grandma was an amazing cook. I have so many food memories associated with her. One recipe of her's that I'd love to recreate is her pavlova, it was always crunchy on the outside, then slightly chewy and then melt in the mouth soft. We always had it on Christmas Day. I've been trying different recipes for the last few years but they never turn out just like grandma's!

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  63. I remember making Baklava with my Mother. I still make it, to this day. It is very addicting. The fabric is gorgeous. Thanks for the chance.

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  64. This time of year especially, I long to recreate my dad's peanut butter pinwheels. I've tried and tried and mine never turn out like his. Miss him greatly! :) Thanks for the chance!

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  65. I remember the licorice drawer at my grandmother's house. Every time we visited we got to run to a certain drawer in her kitchen and get shoestring licorice. I still remember the taste and feel of it in my mouth. She also had the "tube" kind, for drinking 7 Up with. sarah@forrussia.org

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  66. My aunt use to make these creme de menthe squares. She gave me the recipe but Graham crackers have changed and I can't make them the same!

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  67. My mom used to make the most amazing peach cobbler, now mind you I don't care much for peaches and have never liked any other peach cobbler I have eaten, but my moms was tremendous. dawnm1993 at gmail dot com

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  68. The first food story that came to mind is: my children had pie at a friend's house and all of them, separately, told me how amazing this pie was. It was almost time for my daughter's 6th birthday, and she wanted THAT PIE. She wasn't sure if I'd be able to make it as good as Mrs Eva's pie was, but figured it was worth a shot. I got the recipe and made the pie. Sure enough, she thought it was pretty good, but Mrs Eva's was better. The recipe? Cool whip and strawberry yogurt mixed together, put in a Graham cracker crust, and frozen.
    Thanks for the chance! I actually looked fondly (online) at that very fabric just two days ago, but didn't order any....
    Happy stitching ~ Tracy

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  69. The fabrics are beautiful! A custard tart always reminds me of my grandmother. I lived with her for a while and she always made custard tarts for me to take for my lunch. They were so good. I make my own tarts now but they never taste as good as when my grandmother made them for me.

    lin dot web dot 28 at gmail dot com

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  70. My Grandmother's cinnamon rolls were the best. That and her donuts. She used mashed potatoes in both and it did something to the batter. Wonderful!

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  71. When I was a teenager I made the best ginger cake ever. I have no idea where the recipe came from and I've never been able to recreate it since.

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  72. Unlike almost everybody else above, my grandmother and my mother were terrible cooks - probably the models for the joke about putting the brussels sprouts on in November so they'd be ready in time for Christmas lunch. However, my mum did manage to make a halfway decent bread and butter pudding and, even though I'm sure I've been served, and made, much better ones since, the memory of the ones I ate at home prevail.

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  73. Perfectly cooked poached eggs, soft rounded golden yolks reminiscent of the summer sun, whites as soft and fluffy as the clouds, presented on beautifully buttered toast - heaven on a plate. All prepared by my amazing father in law, simply the best! :-)

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  74. My gran was a wonderful cook. She used to make something called suet pudding cooked in a round tin, you cut it in wedges like a cake and had it with gravy before the rest of the meal. I only wish I knew how to make it. Thank you for a gorgeous giveaway, I particularly love the fabric with the deer on. x

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  75. My favourite food memory would have to be my little gran's Victoria sponge cake! We called her little gran as she was 4ft nothing in height and she lived to the ripe old age of 94, that was 11years ago and there isn't a day that goes by that I don't miss her.

    I used to pop in at Christmas and wrap her presents for her ( her wrapping involved just wrapping the cellotape around the parcel and paper, numerouse times until a whole roll was almost used on 1 parcel HA HA) whilst I was there she would make a pot of tea with tea leaves and would produce a freshly made sponge made with Guernsey butter, cream and fresh eggs. half a pint of double cream would be whipped by hand and put in the middle with her homemade jam, completely indulgent and completely wonderful, some of my happiest memories are sitting in front of my Gran's fire, eating her cake and drinking tea. x the fabric is beautiful

    Sarah Boyd
    sarah at cctv dot gg

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  76. My step-mother was a wonderful cook and made a mean cheese and potato pie. Sadly she died a few years ago and I miss her and her comfort cooking.

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  77. My mom wasn't a great cook but when she made: Rolls with ham and cheese in the oven. we mostly had a contest of who could eat the most rolls.
    We also had that same contest when we could eat pancakes.
    Bey

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    Replies
    1. I came on your blog when I was googling my own lastname. 'FLOSSIE'

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  78. When I started teaching I moved to the country and each weekend I would drive home to see my parents and my boyfriend. Mum would ask me for my preference for dinner and invariably I would request roast lamb and pear pie. I have never known anyone else to make pear pie as my mother made it. She made the most delicious shortcut pastry and the pie was served hot like apple pie with cream or ice-cream. Unfortunately I never mastered her technique for making pastry so I can't re-create her masterpiece but I do remember it (and her) very fondly.
    BTW I am retiring this year!
    judybarr (at) iearn(dot)org(dot)au

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  79. A friend of mine made the most perfect chocolate brownie/cake ive ever eaten. Id love to recreate it myself, it was many years ago but I still remember how melt in the mouth delicious it was.

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  80. I loved school dinners as a child ... well some of them anyway. My favourite was cheese and onion flan, made in huge rectangular trays. All the children - myself included - always wanted the corner pieces for the extra bit of yummy pastry. Ultimate comfort food. I'm tempted to recreate it but suspect my adult taste buds would think it completely revolting and therefore spoil my memories.

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  81. I can't say that I've ever associated fabric collections with food (unless it was something obvious such as an ice cream print). Favourite childhood food memory would be a dark chocolate mousse my mum used to make for special occassions.

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  82. When I was young my mum used to make us a wicked fudge cake for your birthdays and it was amazing! A thick layer of fudge right the way through the cake and over the top and sides. Birthdays still make me crave that cake.

    PS. I love love love these fabrics, keeping everything crossed :)

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  83. Nice topic ;) I still remember some special treats, which we had only for christmas or easter: for christmas it was Quality Street confectionary, which was really, really special and we sat there, three cousins, and enjoyed, how the sweets glued our theeth, so it was impossible to speak properly ;))
    Easter is associated with "cat tongues", which sounds dreadful, do you have them in the UK? It´s milk chocolate lokking a little like a cats tongue (but I just read oh wiki, that they are similar in form to langue-de-chat, which are "ladyfingers" in english, I think ....now thats a lot of circumscription ;))) Greetings, Jana (surgeon, you´ve got my email, if I win, which I would love ;))

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  84. We used to go to my Granny's each Saturday for tea and she always had small cakes with icing on them - pale pink, pale yellow and chocolate - they were in silver foil cases and I used to love making things with the foil once I'd eaten the cake.

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  85. We went to Japan for our honeymoon and one of the things we did there was head to the tuna auction at 4am in the morning. After the tour, we sat down for a sushi breakfast - it was the freshest, most delicious sushi I've ever had. Wish Japan was closer as I'd be taking all of my holidays there if I could!

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  86. Many years ago after our parents divorced we would visit our dad on a Sunday afternoon and he would always have a bought battenburg cake for our tea. Not something we ever had at home as mum was a great baker. I love marzipan and the taste always reminds me of Dad. He also had a penchant for peanut butter on toast with a dash of HP sauce. I still eat this and everyone else thinks it's a weird taste combination. Barbara (barbaragreenfield@tiscali.co.uk)

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  87. When I was in single digits I used to spend some weekends with my grandparents and my sister. For breakfast we were allowed to have doorstop thick slices of fresh baked (white!) bread spread with treacle. It was heaven. We nicknamed it "tread on beetle" as a slight play on words. Treacle featured prominently in my childhood, with my other Gran making the world's best treacle toffee. She used to send me a package every November when I went away to university, and I coveted that package and made it last til Christmas. All my grandparents are long dead but it is through the food they made for me as a child that I have my clearest memories of them.

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  88. Poppy seed strudel from the German bakery - long closed.
    Haven't found a replacement bakery since.
    24Tangent@gmail.com

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  89. I remember my dad making us French Toast when we were little and it was delicious. I think it was the only thing he could make then. Sadly he died almost 10 years ago and I recently was thinking abou him and tried to recreate it but it just did not taste hoe I remembered it.

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  90. One Christmas my grandparents took us to a hotel. To my delight I had chocolate ice cream instead of Christmas pudding for dessert. Being only small I had to leave the table for a moment, and when I returned, my remaining ice cream had been cleared away. Such sorrow. Nothing has ever tasted as good as that little dish of chocolate ice cream.

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  91. I think it would have to be the puddings we ate as part of school dinners! Chocolate or vanilla sponge with chocolate sauce or custard. And those iced buns...

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  92. A very small food, but every time we visited the canals in Berkhampstead, we used to call into a pub opposite a cricket green and have a glass of coke and a packet of crisps, my Dad used to work a lot so it was a real treat.

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  93. My mum's chips - neither of us have a deep fat fryer now so she can't make them for me anymore but they were amazing!

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  94. I would love to have my grandma's mac and cheese. Can't replicate it, it never turns out the same. (speddar at hotmail dot com)

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  95. I used to sit and help my grandmother and mother bake welsh cakes as a child. I can still remember the sweet scented baking scent and now bake them with my own child - a timeless tradition in our family as my Grandmother used to bake the same cakes with her mother.

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  96. Sorry, both my parents could not cook and we ate mostly frozen food. I am now learning to cook, but my husband does most of the cooking as I tend to make a mess. (rather sad, I know)

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  97. My mum's apple pie and custard!!

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  98. My nanna is Hungarian and always made me paprika chicken with nokkedli (small dumplings) for special occasions. It was delicious. I can make it but nowhere neat as good as her. She is a lot older now and has not made it for a long time, but I can imagine and almost smell it as she used to make.

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  99. My granny would make the most gorgeous potato cakes... I've never been able to recreate them or buy anything like them. She was a brilliant cook.

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  100. My mother's blackberry jelly. I remember the upturned dining chair on the kitchen table with the jelly straining through a muslin for hours! I used to take a jar of it to boarding school with me to supplement my diet of toast and angel delight (the school meals were foul) and sometimes just open it to smell - tangy and sweet and fruity. Only my Mum could make it like that. :)

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  101. When I think of our families summer holidays in Germany, the first thing that comes to mind is sour dough bread with butter and very fine salami like sausage. So fine it's pink instead of red and white.
    In the mean time I've become a vegetarian, but I remember that that sausage, combined with the bread, was divine.

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  102. My late grandmother made angel food cake with this amazing frosting that caramelized and hardened just right so it stayed in place until you put it in your mouth and it just melted! No one in our family can make it the way she did. When I see a warm brown color of a certain hue I think of it. Sigh.

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  103. I'd love to taste "bitterballen" again, living in The Netherlands we used to get some after a night out. They are like crispy meat croquettes in the shape of small balls. With some mustard it was the best thing to round off a good night! They probably would not taste half as good now, but I always intend to try and make them and never do...

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  104. These look so yummy! I really can't think of anything right now, except I am working on a Low Volume quilt and it reminds me of my MIL chicken and rice dish, taste good but looks so bland.

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  105. It sounds odd but my family has a beach house in Narraganset Bay in Rhode Island. There is a little place that sells clam chowder and homemade donuts. Very, Very odd combo but soooo good.

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  106. Having a daughter who has just learnt how to bake, munching on her first batch of independently made biscuits was a lovely experience. My mum's garden grown raspberry fool is fabulous too though!
    Best wishes and thanks for the chance.
    Wendy
    WBooth-Boyd@hotmail.com

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  107. The fabric is so so so beautiful; it reminds me of coconut ice for some reason! thanks for the chance :)

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  108. My food memory is of my mom's beef stew best ever:)

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  109. I have two foody memories, 1) the sweet taste of peas still in there pods eaten straight from the stalk I still eat them raw in salads so fresh and 2) my Nans bacon sandwiches, she taught me to crochet, knit and sew and staying there was the ultimate craft retreat, I later found out she would dip the door stop wedges of fresh bread in the bacon lard something I can't bring myself to do but they were always divine!

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  110. My mom's angel biscuits. I don't cook and my husband, who does cook, is not as excited about baking, so I don't get to eat them as much as I'd like. But nothing beats that light, fluffy, melt-in-your-mouth taste, especially when they are dripping with butter and homemade jam.

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  111. I loved doing all the Christmas baking with my mum…Puddings, mincemeat and Christmas cake :) It was hard to choose just one though! Thanks for the chance to win this gorgeous bundle!

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  112. Right now, cereal is sounding pretty good ;)

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  113. My memory is of eating vanilla ice-cream with my Mum. She developed Alzheimer's Disease about ten years ago but we still managed to go out in the car to her favourite ice-cream parlour. Now she is totally dependent on other people to care for her. Sometimes I feed her the ice-cream she loved. Occasionally I get a faint smile and a look of pleasure, other times there's nothing there. So a happy and a sad memory in one.

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  114. My memory is of baking christmas biscuits with my mum in the run up to christmas. I am German and there it is tradition to bake lots of different types of biscuits. However I never get them to taste as good as the ones I used to make with my mum!

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  115. My favorite memory of a meal, or food, was a wild blueberry pie I once shared with my best girlfriend Johanna and her whole family in a tiny tiny hamlet in the French Pyrenees, in late August. After we had spent the day picking up blueberries up in the mountain I baked those two big and simple blueberry pies. The fifteen of us, all gathered and packed by the lightened fireplace, cheerful, talking, laughing, it was a delight. I remember my firend’s 80-year-old Italian nonna (granny), all joy, talking about her next trip to Italy with her girlfriends, a huge smile on her face. She may as well have been seventeen. And I remember my friend, and the two of us laughing our hearts out at one another because of our blackened teeth that made us look like witches. It was an out of time moment, filled with warmth, friendship, and love.

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  116. I absolutely love love love this fabric!!!!!!!!!!!!! I would find a way to incorporate into a quilt!!!!!! sonjasmith76@yahoo.com

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  117. My favorite meal memory is from when I was very, very little. My dad used to make homemade crab cakes (he worked on a fishing boat in Alaska) that were so fantastic! He rarely makes them anymore, and he gave me the recipe, but they never quite taste the same as his when I make them!

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  118. These fabrics are so so gorgeous! I'd love to make little girl dresses out of them. I'm totally in love with any fabric that has gold in it right now!

    WHen I was younger, I sang in a small children's opera company in Australia. One night we were asked to perform for a 6 star cruise ship that was making one stop in Australia only. The food that they were served that night was all the absolute very best cuisine available in my state (tasmania). But we were just the hired performers so we didn't get any! Eventually though, we were finally given some food - I think it was potato wedges with very expensive sour cream. After the show, the orchestra told us to go ask the kitchen if they had leftover desserts (this was their trick!) and low and behold, they did! MOST amazing desserts I had ever had in my life up until that point!

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Florence x

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