Monday, 1 April 2019

Nani Iro Cotton Sateen Quilt

Nani Iro Fuccra Rakuen Cotton Sateen Diamond Quilt

This is what's on my design wall at the moment (it should be noted that I do always feel faintly ridiculous when I refer to this as a 'design wall' - it makes me feel as though great and serious things should be going on up there. A 'quilt planning wall' sits more comfortably for me, but rejecting a widely understood term in favour of one that lacks any finesse feels just as ridiculous, so the upshot seems to be that, whichever way I turn, I am destined to feel ridiculous around one of these fabric-grabbing walls. Thankfully, I only think about it when I go to write the word down, so it's not a lasting affliction).

My quilt features two colourways of Nani Iro's beautiful Fuccra Rakuen design, one of my very favourite prints. It's cotton sateen, which I'd been nervous about making a quilt from, but when it arrived I found it lacks the sheen that sateen can sometimes have and feels a perfectly acceptable quilt fabric (although if you're a dressmaker, this would make the most amazing dress/skirt/blouse). The cream colourway is from this Etsy shop in Germany and the teal blue is from this one in Japan.

Nani Iro Fuccra Rakuen Cotton Sateen

Ideally, I would have gathered a few more prints together, but I couldn't find anything else in cotton sateen that went well with these, so I stuck at two. Whenever I'm lacking inspiration and want to make a quilt that showcases a particular fabric, I often turn to Jane Brocket's Gentle Art of Quilt-Making and did just that here. I'd already been considering diamonds as their shape would allow the two fabrics to intermingle, softening the contrast between the two colours (rather than forming into geometric blocks, which is what would more likely happen using squares) and Jane happens to have a really beautiful diamond quilt in her book (top right in the photo below). Even though it uses several prints, it confirmed my feeling that it could be a good option. The hardback is now out of print by the way, but worth buying second-hand for the beautiful cover hiding beneath the dust jacket, although the paperback looks very lovely too. Either way, I think it's one of those books that it's an essential in any quilt book library.

Jane Brocket's Gentle Art of Quilt-Making book

It actually took me all day to cut the diamonds at the top of this post - and that's just half a quilt's worth. I find the cutting and drawing of lines onto the fabric for hand-piecing far less engaging than the cutting and wrapping process of English paper piecing. However, I've since had lots of suggestions as to how to make this bit go more quickly, including the idea of using stamps and ink pads in future, which Helen discusses in this blog post (including links for where to buy them). Sadly, the stamps are at too small a scale for this project - a complaint I never thought I'd be able to make given my love of miniature - but I'll definitely look into these for my next hand-piecing project.

Wishing you a happy week,
Florence x

7 comments:

  1. The fabric is lovely--as is the large scale choice of patterns for showing it off. Are you still working on the Trip Around the World quilt? When you finish it I would love to see it finished--mainly because I'm contemplating making one as soon as I finish the quilt that's on my quilt planning wall. I must admit that does sound more down to earth and, in fact, that is more in line with my life style.

    We love hearing what you are up to. Maxine

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    1. Hello Maxine, I've actually given up on that one as my fabrics felt too stark for such a geometric pattern, if that makes sense. I did use that same pattern for Nell's dog bed, using Liberty prints, and loved it, so it's not the pattern that's at fault, just my choices. It's worth looking on Pinterest or Instagram as you'll find masses of Scrappy Trip Around the World inspiration in either of those places. Good luck with your quilt. x

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  2. No matter what you call it, I would love to know by what magic those pieces of pretty fabric are being held in place - I see no pins :)

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    1. You're right - no pins. If you line the wall in a flannel fabric it just 'grabs' the cotton and it sticks there all by itself for months on end! I've written a post about it here: https://flossieteacakes.blogspot.com/2014/07/a-quilt-design-wall.html . x

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    2. I just wrote a long reply and then instead of hitting Publish I signed out of google and had to go unearth my PW - argh! Anyway, thank you so much - this is such a great idea!

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  3. Oh! That is gorgeous! Love the fabrics! Please let us see the finalquilt when you finish it. I had not heard of the quilting stamps before - ingeniuos!

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    1. Thank you so much :) There's a slow progress update in my next post...but there's still a long way to go! x

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Florence x

A few of the books/products that I link to on Amazon from my blog contain affiliate links and very occasionally, I'll mention a product that I've been given free of charge. I choose the things that I recommend carefully and my priority is to only share things that I love.